Benefits Blog: Are you an ALE?

The definition of what constitutes an “applicable large employer,” or ALE, can have a significant impact on how that enterprise must arrange for and cover the cost of health care coverage.  Be sure you know whether your organization qualifies as an ALE in the eyes of the federal government, especially the Internal Revenue Service.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires ALEs to offer affordable, minimum value health coverage to their fulltime employees or pay a penalty. This employer mandate is also known as the “employer shared responsibility” or “pay or play” rules.

To qualify as an ALE, an employer must employ, on average, at least 50 full-time employees, including full-time equivalent employees (FTEs), on business days during the preceding calendar year. All employers that employ at least 50 full-time employees, including FTEs, are subject to the ACA’s employer shared responsibility rules, including for-profit, nonprofit and government employers.

A Full-Time Employee is an individual that works, on average, 30 or more hours of service each week. For this purpose, 130 hours in a calendar month is treated as the monthly equivalent of 30 hours of service per week.

Equivalent Full Time Employee counts are determined by looking at part-time employees. Hours worked by employees with fewer than 30 hours per week must be counted—and then divided by 120 per month—to determine the number of FTEs. The number of FTEs is then added to the actual full-time employee count

As you might expect, the definitions surrounding what constitutes affordable, minimum value health coverage can become intricate and technical, as well.  But if you’re an ALE, it’s your responsibility to know the rules and abide by them.

Contact the Benefits Team at The Reschini Group for more information and guidance.


Copyright 2020 The Reschini Group

The Reschini Group provides these updates for information only, and does not provide legal advice.  To make decisions regarding insurance matters, please consult directly with a licensed insurance professional or firm.

Testing Cyber Security Systems

Cybercrime is set to cost companies more than $6 trillion per year by 2021.  That’s trillion, with a T.  Nobody wants to be in that pile.  That’s why testing your systems for cyber security makes a lot of sense.

Three main tests are used to safeguard businesses against cyber attacks:

Vulnerability scannersThis approach assesses the computers in your business network for weaknesses: entry points that can be exploited by cybercriminals hoping to gain access to your data.  Vulnerability scanners act like hackers to investigate these potential vulnerabilities. The aim of a vulnerability scan is to build a strong sense of the state of your cybersecurity setup from an internal and external perspective, identify weaknesses, and improve your security to better protect against these risks.

Penetration testingHere, cybersecurity experts purposefully ‘attack’ a network to review how secure it is. It simulates a real attack, but in a controlled way. As such, the term ‘ethical hacking’ is sometimes applied to penetration testing. While vulnerability scans highlight any weaknesses in your business network, penetration tests take this a step further by determining what kind of malicious activity is possible if those weaknesses are exploited.

Program update checksThese are important because software that is not regularly updated gives attackers more chances of infiltrating your system and your business.  Some program settings may allow automatic software updates, and others will ask your permission. All users should regularly check to ensure that all available updates are accepted (or scheduled for a convenient time) on every device they are responsible for.

The continuously and rapidly evolving cyber world offers tremendous competitive advantages and cost efficiencies.  The dark side of cyber operations moves just as swiftly, though.  Check the status of your cybersecurity insurance by contacting the professionals at The Reschini Group.


Copyright 2020 The Reschini Group

The Reschini Group provides these updates for information only, and does not provide legal advice.  To make decisions regarding insurance matters, please consult directly with a licensed insurance professional or firm.

Excerpted from: https://blog.avast.com/cybersecurity-tests